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2
Feb

Avoiding futile CPR: a duty of care at the end of life

By Associate Professor Will Cairns

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a violent activity. Many of those subjected to CPR suffer multiple broken bones or severe internal injuries. For otherwise healthy people who experience a heart attack or an accident, the benefits can outweigh the risks. However, for patients who are dying from life-ending and irreversible illnesses, or have chosen not to have their life prolonged, CPR offers no benefit.

1
Feb

Mutated stem cells emerge as a major cause of heart attacks and stroke, as deadly as high blood pressure or cholesterol

It’s widely known that cancer is driven by the build-up of mutations in the DNA of cells. Everything from pollutants to cigarettes to exposure to everyday chemicals can alter genes, and continued exposure over a lifetime can lead to a critical mass of mutations. Research now shows that the same process can cause heart disease and stroke. 

1
Feb

New study shows that regular sunscreen use could cut Australian melanoma rates by a third

We all know the benefits of using sunscreen but a recent study by Brisbane's QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute shows just how beneficial applying sunscreen can be.

19
Jan

Pregnancy really does cause "baby brain" according to new Australian research

So-called “baby brain” refers to increased forgetfulness, inattention, and mental “fogginess” reported by four out of five pregnant women.

19
Jan

New study shows over 50% of Australian nursing students have been bullied or harassed during clinical placement

It would be difficult to find someone in Australia who hasn’t heard about the #MeToo and “Time’s Up” campaigns against sexual harassment that started in Hollywood and are now spreading out into other lines of work, and bringing the topics of workplace harassment and bullying into the light. 

18
Jan

Electronic medication management systems improve safety, efficiency and quality

Medication errors remain the second most common type of medical incident reported in Australian hospitals and, of all medication errors, omission or overdose of medicines occurs most frequently. Reducing all errors will significantly improve patient safety and the quality use of medicines. 

18
Jan

Five ways healthcare informatics help nurses

Ever evolving, healthcare informatics and technology assist the advancement of medicine and ensure patient safety. Email fatigue is real, new electronic health record systems can be tough to master, and who can remember all their passwords? However, despite these pitfalls, technology doesn’t have to be the enemy. When it comes to healthcare, Informatics and technology can save lives, shorten wait times, and increase patient safety, satisfaction and better health outcomes.

Healthcare informatics and technology can help nurses….

17
Jan

Melanoma is in the eye of the beholder - Groundbreaking Queensland research discovers new cancer predictor

University of Queensland researchers have found that freckles and moles appearing on the iris indicate a high risk of melanoma, particularly in people under 40 years of age. Their groundbreaking study, "Iris pigmented lesions as a marker of cutaneous melanoma risk: an Australian case-control study"  (available in full text on CKN) involved 1,117 participants of European background living in South-East Queensland.

17
Jan

Intimate partner violence is a leading health risk factor for women in Australia

The Queensland Government plays a critical role in not only ensuring its employees are protected at work, but as the state’s biggest employer, it also demonstrates to the business community that intimate partner violence is a workplace issue.

17
Jan

Managing Irukandji Syndrome

Managing Irukandji Syndrome is important for many emergency departments, particularly in North Queensland. The recent discovery of irukandji jellyfish off Fraser Island, and with four people hospitalised in the past weeks as a result of irukandji stings, serve as a timely reminder of the danger presented by these and other marine stingers, and a warning to EDs outside of traditional stinger areas that they may become more prevalent. Despite the low incidence, the condition is associated with possible life-threatening cardiovascular complications that make it difficult to manage.

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