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20
Aug

UQ researcher unravels the mystery of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Another piece in the puzzle that is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has been solved by a University of Queensland researcher in a step towards developing treatments for a disease that affects about one in every five Australians.

17
Aug

Should nurses be expected to be role models for healthy lifestyles?

Whether they like it or not, nurses are often expected to be public role models for healthy lifestyles. Although this expectation is often expressed in professional journals, there is little research on whether it is reasonable and realistic. UK researchers investigated the views of different stakeholder groups on the subject, with their study finding that opinions on the matter differ widely among participants talking from different viewpoints.

15
Aug

New study: Epidural rates in labour could be halved with use of painkiller remifentanil

Giving pregnant women on-demand access to the synthetic opioid remifentanil during labour could not only halve the number needing an epidural but could also substantially reduce rates of instrumental deliveries, according to the results of a large scale trial in the UK.

26
Jul

Nurses' guide to interacting with people on the autism spectrum

Have you ever felt unprepared to navigate nursing encounters with patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)? If so, you're not alone. Many healthcare professionals report a lack of self-confidence when caring for patients with ASD.

26
Jul

A new drug, tafenoquine, offers hope of battling the resurgence of malaria on Australia’s doorstep

Malaria rates have soared among some of Australia's closest neighbours as complacency risks undoing a decade of sustained and extraordinary progress towards eradicating the disease, experts warn. In 2016 there were an estimated 216 million malaria cases globally. Papua New Guinea recorded a staggering 400 per cent surge in malaria between 2010 and 2016, WHO figures show, with an estimated 1.4 million malaria cases and 3000 deaths in 2016. 

26
Jul

Nurses have their finger on the pulse - new study shows nursing notes may indicate survival rates of ICU patients

The sentiments left in nursing notes are good indicators of whether ICU patients will survive, a UK study has found. Researchers at the University of Waterloo looked at the notes from over 27,000 ICU patients and examined how sentiments related to 30-day mortality and survival.

26
Jul

Early trial results show promise for new Alzheimer’s drug

The long, discouraging quest for a medication that works to treat Alzheimer’s reached a potentially promising milestone this week. For the first time in a large clinical trial, a drug was able to both reduce the plaques in the brains of patients and slow the progression of dementia. More extensive trials will be needed to know if the new drug is truly effective, but if the results, presented Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Chicago, are borne out, the drug may be the first to successfully attack both the brain changes and the symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

26
Jul

New hope for the 700,000 Australia women suffering from endometriosis

What was once a common condition suffered largely in silence and out of public view has recently been gaining more exposure, and not before time. The roughly 700,000 Australian women and girls with the “insidious" disease endometriosis will now have their condition better recognised with the federal government releasing their $4.5 million National Action Plan for Endometriosis that acknowledges its "historic failures" and charts a path to a cure.

25
Jul

Hospital children's wards too noisy, affecting sleep – new UK study

In paediatric wards with high levels of night noise, children slept around an hour less and had poorer quality sleep, compared with sleeping at home, according to a small study from Southampton Children's Hospital. This could affect the child's behaviour, recovery and pain tolerance, the researchers suggest.

18
Jul

Australian experts develop game-changing therapy for severe asthma

The latest therapy in the treatment of severe asthma has been described as a “game-changer” by one of Australian’s leading experts in the field. Conjoint Professor Peter Gibson, co-Director of the Centre for Healthy Lungs at the University of Newcastle said that targeted monoclonal antibody therapy was changing the lives of about half the people with severe asthma. 

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