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16
Mar

Clinician Profile – Carol Wylie, Manager, Queensland Poisons Information Centre

A toddler drinks a bottle of paracetamol. A grandmother is given another resident’s medication at her nursing home. A teenager falls unconscious after taking unknown pills at a festival. Poisonings come in many different flavours and are more common than many people might think. Worldwide they’re a major cause of morbidity and mortality and represent a significant public health threat, especially to children. 

16
Mar

Calcium supplements may increase risk of abnormal bowel growths (polyps)

Calcium supplements, taken with or without vitamin D, may increase the risk of small growths in the large bowel (colon) called polyps, suggest results from a large US trial.

2
Mar

Over 63,000 fewer hospital acquired pressure injuries in Queensland thanks to a decade long initiative

Anyone confined to a bed or chair for a long time is at risk of developing a pressure injury, a painful and serious problem if inadequately untreated. But thanks to the state-wide Pressure Injury Prevention Program, pressure injuries have dropped in Queensland by over 77% since the program started in 2003.

16
Feb

New NSQHS Standards (second edition) commence 1 January 2019

The new second edition of the NSQHS Standards was released in November 2017, and assessment to the second edition will commence from 1 January 2019. The second edition addresses gaps identified in the first edition, including mental health and cognitive impairment, health literacy, end-of-life care, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. It also updates the evidence for actions, consolidates and streamlines standards and actions to make them clearer and easier to implement.

16
Feb

Queensland researchers rediscover a 40yo antibiotic to turn the tables on the worst superbugs

As scientists look for new ways to tackle the growing problem of drug-resistant bacteria that evolve to resist our strongest medicines, they've hit upon a new strategy: using modern-day drug analysis to re-evaluate antibiotics overlooked in the past. An antibiotic that's been forgotten since its discovery 40 years ago could now help develop new drugs against life-threatening infections caused by some of the world’s most dangerous superbugs.

16
Feb

New research opens the door to better treatment and prevention options for ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is one of the top 10 killers of Australian women. Every day in Australia, four women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and three will die from the disease. Unfortunately, this has not changed in 30 years, but newly published research could open the door to more effective treatment and prevention options.

15
Feb

Recruiting new Clinical Champions for 2018

CKN is recruiting for the next wave of Clinical Champions. The CKN Clinical Champions program helps spread awareness of the wide range of evidence-based clinical resources that CKN contains, how to find them, and how to use the various tools CKN offers. Our Champions are clinicians who are enthusiastic about CKN and keen to help their colleagues make best use of the tools available to them.

13
Feb

Can bloodsucking parasitic hookworms be the secret weapon against coeliac disease and type 2 diabetes?

We collectively cringed at the recent news of a Sunshine Coast woman who contracted hookworm while holidaying at An Bang Beach in Vietnam, yet Queensland scientists have been voluntarily infecting themselves with the worms for the sake of medical research.

9
Feb

Clinician Profile – Drew Hebbron, Acting Director, Queensland Ambulance Service Education Centre (QASEC)

The Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) is an integral part of the primary healthcare sector in Queensland through the delivery of timely, patient-focused ambulance services. The QAS operates as a statewide service with a significant presence throughout Queensland, delivering services from 290 response locations through 16 Local Ambulance Service Networks (LASNs) based around Hospital and Health Service boundaries.

2
Feb

Avoiding futile CPR: a duty of care at the end of life

By Associate Professor Will Cairns

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a violent activity. Many of those subjected to CPR suffer multiple broken bones or severe internal injuries. For otherwise healthy people who experience a heart attack or an accident, the benefits can outweigh the risks. However, for patients who are dying from life-ending and irreversible illnesses, or have chosen not to have their life prolonged, CPR offers no benefit.

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