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'Cellular barcoding' reveals how breast cancer spreads

A cutting-edge technique called cellular barcoding has been used to tag, track and pinpoint cells responsible for the spread of breast cancer from the main tumour into the blood and other organs. The technique also revealed how chemotherapy temporarily shrinks the number of harmful cells, rather than eliminating them, explaining how the cancer could eventually relapse.

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Blindfolds improve leadership in paediatric resuscitation training

Doctors have found that paediatric team leaders improve more during resuscitation training if they wear a blindfold. The research team's findings demonstrate a promising tool for improving training and outcomes in paediatric resuscitation.

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What makes women abandon their dreams of becoming surgeons?

Women make up just 11% of consultant surgeons, yet 60% of medical students are female. New research by Gold Coast Health general surgeon Dr Rhea Liang now provides insights into why so many women walk away from their surgical training.

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One-third of pregnant women do not believe cannabis is harmful to their baby

While it is widely known that the use of alcohol and tobacco are detrimental to a baby’s development, a new literature review conducted by researchers at the University of British Columbia discovered that pregnant women are far less likely to perceive cannabis use to be harmful in spite of recent evidence to the contrary.

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Evidence-based guidance on flood-related bacteria and diseases

Floodwater can harbour dangerous soil-borne bacteria and disease organisms that pose serious health risks to the general public, as well as emergency services and health workers in affected regions. In the wake of recent flooding in North and North West Queensland there has been one death and several people have been hospitalised as a result of infection from environmental bacteria, in particular melioidosis.

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Delaying a newborn's first bath helps boost breastfeeding rates

Delaying the bathing of newborns for at least 12 hours after birth is associated with significant improvements in exclusive breastfeeding while in hospital and with mothers being more likely to have feeding plans on discharge that include human milk (exclusively or in addition to formula).

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Emergency caesareans put first time mothers at higher risk of developing postnatal depression

A new study has revealed first-time mothers who give birth via unplanned caesarean section are 15% more likely to experience postnatal depression, prompting calls for more mental health support for women whose babies are delivered via emergency caesarean section.

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Overcrowding, an emergency for EDs

Overcrowding is a global concern for emergency departments (EDs) around the world. ED volume continues to grow at a steady pace, and as a result, hospitals are faced with increased adverse patient outcomes, higher mortality rates, longer lengths of stay and increased readmissions.

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Rotavirus vaccine associated with a decline in type 1 diabetes, according to Australian researchers

A vaccine that protects infants from a severe gastroenteritis-causing virus may provide an unexpected bonus; helping to prevent type 1 diabetes. The rotavirus vaccine became a routine immunisation for Australian babies in 2007, and unlike some other countries, it’s had widespread uptake. Now a new Australian study published online in JAMA Pediatrics, may have uncovered an added benefit to the childhood vaccination.

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Everything you need to know to get through your internship (relatively) intact

The Junior Doctor Survival Guide is a companion to the new students, interns and residents beginning their journeys as clinicians. Written by residents, for interns and residents, the Junior Doctor Survival Guide is a thorough summary of everything you need to know to get through your internship and residency (relatively) intact.

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